Low-cost solutions produce high-quality results

An educational and on-ground program of low-cost erosion control techniques makes a big impact in the Kyeamba Valley

Low-cost solutions produce high-quality results

An educational and on-ground program of low-cost erosion control techniques makes a big impact in the Kyeamba Valley

Community Participation -

LP011-R002

The issue

Erosion in the Kyeamba Valley has been a significant issue for many years, with most landholders dealing with headcut formation and migration, channel incision and gully or tributary erosion at multiple sites across their properties. In order to manage the erosion, and reduce its ongoing progression across valuable farmland, landholders have used a range of costly engineering solutions, most with limited success. Farmers were keen to repair the damage, but needed a new solution.

The solution

With the assistance of a qualified consultant, we were able to provide landholders with tailored solutions for their erosion issues using a variety of low-cost erosion control techniques. The structures used for headcut stabilisation included brush ramps, log steps, rock rundowns, tyre mattresses and poplar headcut armouring. We also introduced various grade control structures, including brush mattressing, brush weirs and one rock dams. Landholders were given practical demonstrations in the construction of each type of structure through a series of field days, while a Case Study Booklet produced through the project documented the various structures and provided examples of where they had been utilised on local properties.

The impact

We found that most landholders already have (or have easy access to) the materials necessary to complete erosion control works on their properties; these include rock, bricks, cement, tyres and similar items. Given that landholders were able to make use of materials already available, the actual cost of each erosion-control structure was often far less than originally budgeted for. As a result, we were able to fund more than four times the number of works that had initially been planned. This was an excellent result, but also meant we needed to find a way to enable landholders to complete the manual labour required for the construction of up to 10 structures on a single property. This was primarily achieved through the promotion of working bee events, where groups of neighbouring landholders would come together to help each other with the labour on each of their sites. These activities served also to increase motivation, share learnings, increase the speed of on-ground work completion and strengthen community links.

Key facts

  • 86 erosion control structures built and installed
  • 211 landholders involved
  • 3 publications produced
  • 7 field days
  • 4 educational events with the local primary school
  • 6.3 ha revegetated

Project Partners