An update on the Lake George research on lake levels and climate change - 11 August (The past as a key to the future)

11 August 2020 - Sutton School - 7.30pm - An update on the Lake George research on lake levels and climate change - The past as a key to the future. On 11 August 2020 Sutton Landcare will hold its second presentation for the year, at the Sutton Primary School from 7.30. Like everywhere else, we will abide by the COVID-19 rules, which means social distancing, hand sanitising and leaving the classroom as clean as possible. We are very pleased the Sutton Primary School has been supportive of Landcare once again. If you feel uncomfortable joining us in person, you can follow the presentation via Zoom. Please contact us via email on sutton.landcare@gmail.com and we will email you the registration details. The presentation will be given by Dr Brad Opdyke from the ANU. He will update us on his research at Lake George. He sent us the following abstract: "When we started the Lake George project the correlation between warmer climate and lake levels in Lake George was and is pretty clear, i.e. if sea surface temperatures around the northwest of Australia were high then the area around Lake George certainly enjoyed more rain, and more consistent rain. However, as most people know from their own experience on their own properties, the last several decades have been some of the driest in the past century. So, what gives? Why the disconnect? We know the planet is heating up and the waters of the Indo-Pacific warm pool are heating up as well. As the project has progressed, Brad learned more about the detailed climatology of southeast Australia and importantly the difference between relatively stable climate states and a ‘transient’ state. The transient, from a climate modelers perspective is the path you follow from one relatively stable climate to the next. At the moment we are in a dramatic transient. To cut a longer story short, the transient state can be very different to more stable conditions. The good news is that a stable slightly hotter world will probably be significantly wetter and more humid than the conditions we are now experiencing. The bad news is that during the transient, while temperatures are rapidly increasing, we will experience wildly variable fluctuations in rainfall, from year to year. And like the stock market during COVID-19 the amplitude of the swings in rainfall, for example, will be extreme, and probably will be more extreme if the global temperature rise is allowed to continue to accelerate".
  • An update on the Lake George research on lake levels and climate change - 11 August (The past as a key to the future)
  • 2020-08-09T19:30:00+10:00
  • 2020-08-09T21:30:00+10:00
  • 11 August 2020 - Sutton School - 7.30pm - An update on the Lake George research on lake levels and climate change - The past as a key to the future. On 11 August 2020 Sutton Landcare will hold its second presentation for the year, at the Sutton Primary School from 7.30. Like everywhere else, we will abide by the COVID-19 rules, which means social distancing, hand sanitising and leaving the classroom as clean as possible. We are very pleased the Sutton Primary School has been supportive of Landcare once again. If you feel uncomfortable joining us in person, you can follow the presentation via Zoom. Please contact us via email on sutton.landcare@gmail.com and we will email you the registration details. The presentation will be given by Dr Brad Opdyke from the ANU. He will update us on his research at Lake George. He sent us the following abstract: "When we started the Lake George project the correlation between warmer climate and lake levels in Lake George was and is pretty clear, i.e. if sea surface temperatures around the northwest of Australia were high then the area around Lake George certainly enjoyed more rain, and more consistent rain. However, as most people know from their own experience on their own properties, the last several decades have been some of the driest in the past century. So, what gives? Why the disconnect? We know the planet is heating up and the waters of the Indo-Pacific warm pool are heating up as well. As the project has progressed, Brad learned more about the detailed climatology of southeast Australia and importantly the difference between relatively stable climate states and a ‘transient’ state. The transient, from a climate modelers perspective is the path you follow from one relatively stable climate to the next. At the moment we are in a dramatic transient. To cut a longer story short, the transient state can be very different to more stable conditions. The good news is that a stable slightly hotter world will probably be significantly wetter and more humid than the conditions we are now experiencing. The bad news is that during the transient, while temperatures are rapidly increasing, we will experience wildly variable fluctuations in rainfall, from year to year. And like the stock market during COVID-19 the amplitude of the swings in rainfall, for example, will be extreme, and probably will be more extreme if the global temperature rise is allowed to continue to accelerate".
  • When 09 Aug, 2020 from 07:30 PM to 09:30 PM (Australia/Sydney / UTC1000)
  • Where Sutton Primary School
  • Contact Name
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