North West Native Plants - How to recognise high value bushland

Guided walks through beautiful settings that demonstrate diversity, structure, recruitment and connectivity attributes of good quality native vegetation.

North West Native Plants - How to recognise high value bushland

Guided walks through beautiful settings that demonstrate diversity, structure, recruitment and connectivity attributes of good quality native vegetation.

Capacity to Deliver -

LP024-R004

The issue

When travelling the North West of NSW one can see large patches of hillside trees and wooded waterways with lots of healthy looking trees. The problem however, is that trees alone do not indicate a healthy natural system.

In fact, the vast majority of remaining native bushland across most of the North West region is in very poor condition, demonstrated by the decline or complete loss of local animal species. This decline is continuing as the remaining patches lose their normal resilience and succumb to increasing pressure from pests and drought. Furthermore, the resilient remnants that are in good condition are often too small or fragmented to sustain a fauna population such as the Regent Honeyeater or Koala.

So if it's not just lots of trees that indicate healthy bushland, what is it?

The solution

Tamworth Regional Landcare and North West Local Land Services hosted a series of guided walks through remnant vegetation communities that are exemplar of high value biodiversity and potential Regent Honey Eater habitat / geographies.

The walks were free and open to landholders, volunteers and everyone interested in learning more about the biodiversity specific to their area.

The program design had a very focused outcome, that individuals learn to recognise and appreciate key natural assets specific to their local environment. The walks looked at ecological features of the community.

The impact

A total of 14 members of the public attended the walks and their feedback was extremely positive, with individuals able to recognise key natural assets specific to their local environment.

The project also funded a reprint of the popular Plant Identification Field Guide that is the only publication specific to the local area with colour pictures.

Key facts

  • Structure - lower mid and upper stories
  • Diversity - the key species to look for (distribution and abundance)
  • Recruitment - a variety of age classes
  • Connectivity – access to water and other populations for breeding

Project Partners